Judo O Soto Gari Major Outer Reap

O-soto-gari (major outer reap)

This throw ranks as number two in the big contest throws. The reasons for this is that

there is nearly always an opportunity for it. Secondly, it can be done very quickly and thirdly,

once in position, it is very difficult for the opponent to escape. Also the man who uses o-sotogari

can apply a lot of power for forcing the throw through even if he is only partially in

position. Study the photographs. You will see that the attacker has swept his partner’s leg off the

ground with his right leg and is throwing him to his right back corner.

The moment for this throw is when your opponent’s right leg and side are forward either

when he is stationary or moving forward or backwards. Stand with your partner in the natural

posture. In order to sweep the opponent’s leg successfully step with the left foot out to his right

side and close to his right foot.

Instantly the right leg follows through sweeping in an ellipse against the back of the

opponent’s leg. To complete the throw sweep vigorously back with right leg scooping both of the

opponent’s legs up and dropping him on his back. As in all these throws where you take away

an opponent’s legs, you must make sure that his weight is on the leg. Notice in plate 161 that my

opponent’s left foot is almost off the mat.

In this throw the arms and shoulders push the opponent back and over his right leg. The

action of the arms is not isolated. They start working before or at the same time you step out

with your left leg.

This throw is my particular favourite. I’ve studied it for a long time and have come to the

conclusion that the action of the arms is most important especially the right arm.

This throw seems deceptively easy. One reason for this is that it is easy to move the feet

quickly and get the right leg almost in position. For this reason everybody tries it. However,

because of bad arm work in the majority of cases, it rarely comes off.

With his right leg in position, it is often possible for an experienced man to hop forward

until his arms come into play and with further hopping and hooking with his right leg force the

throw through. However, to move in quickly and throw the man on the spot needs positive

armwork.

Judo O Soto Gari Major Outer Reap

O-soto-gari (major outer reap)

This throw ranks as number two in the big contest throws. The reasons for this is that

there is nearly always an opportunity for it. Secondly, it can be done very quickly and thirdly,

once in position, it is very difficult for the opponent to escape. Also the man who uses o-sotogari

can apply a lot of power for forcing the throw through even if he is only partially in

position. Study the photographs. You will see that the attacker has swept his partner's leg off the

ground with his right leg and is throwing him to his right back corner.

The moment for this throw is when your opponent's right leg and side are forward either

when he is stationary or moving forward or backwards. Stand with your partner in the natural

posture. In order to sweep the opponent's leg successfully step with the left foot out to his right

side and close to his right foot.

Instantly the right leg follows through sweeping in an ellipse against the back of the

opponent's leg. To complete the throw sweep vigorously back with right leg scooping both of the

opponent's legs up and dropping him on his back. As in all these throws where you take away

an opponent's legs, you must make sure that his weight is on the leg. Notice in plate 161 that my

opponent's left foot is almost off the mat.

In this throw the arms and shoulders push the opponent back and over his right leg. The

action of the arms is not isolated. They start working before or at the same time you step out

with your left leg.

This throw is my particular favourite. I've studied it for a long time and have come to the

conclusion that the action of the arms is most important especially the right arm.

This throw seems deceptively easy. One reason for this is that it is easy to move the feet

quickly and get the right leg almost in position. For this reason everybody tries it. However,

because of bad arm work in the majority of cases, it rarely comes off.

With his right leg in position, it is often possible for an experienced man to hop forward

until his arms come into play and with further hopping and hooking with his right leg force the

throw through. However, to move in quickly and throw the man on the spot needs positive

armwork.
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